PPC Versus CPC: The Distinction and How To Set Up Your First Marketing campaign

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Searching or browsing the internet inevitably means that you will come across a list of paid ads before settling for organic content. Or to find a sponsored ad with the rest of your social feed.

Sometimes that’s exactly what you’re looking for, or these ads answer the question you were looking for – so click.

Advertisers paid you to make their results interesting enough to communicate with you.

The type of marketing campaign is PPC. The price associated with clicking on PPC ads is CPC.

Let’s dive in.

What is the difference between PPC and CPC?

Pay-per-click, or PPC, is a paid advertising method in which companies only pay for an ad placement after they click on it. These ads usually appear at the top of search engine results (SERPs) or when browsing social media.

Cost-per-click (CPC) is the total cost of each click.

PPC versus CPC example

You’re a marketing strategist and want your business to gain more resonance online. After doing some research, you will find that paid advertising is a great way to get customers to your website quickly.

One method you can find is PPC.

A well-placed PPC marketing ad will increase the number of new acquisitions and improve your SERP presence faster than better. Search engine optimization (SEO). SEO can help you rank higher organically on search engines, but it takes longer.

As a result, you write ad copies and landing pages to bid for keywords that appear at the top of Google SERPs. These ads navigate to optimized landing pages that respond to the search your customers are looking for.

You decide to run your PPC campaign for $ 100 for a day. Your ad received 250 clicks on that day. Divide the cost of the ad and the number of times it was clicked and you will see that the CPC for the PPC ad was $ 0.40.

In other words:

Maximum PPC campaign limit of $ 100/250 clicks = $ 0.40 CPC

Hence, PPC is the type of marketing campaign where CPC is the cost of running.

Reach customers where they are

PPC can come in many different forms. Display ads are used on Instagram and Facebook.

Video ads are typical of YouTube.

Text advertising is mostly used on Google, but you’ve also seen videos viewed and shopped here.

The PPC strategy can include multiple platforms, e.g.

  • Google Ads.
  • Microsoft Ads.
  • YouTube ads.
  • Facebook ads.
  • Instagram ads.

Links are an example of Google PPC ads for marketing agencies looking to sell their strategies. The question, “How does pay-per-click work?” Is a key concept that encompasses a process of content and bidding.

This process includes creating ad copies and landing pages. Marketers then offer the keyword “like pay-per-click” in Google Ads to buy their place on SERP pages in the hopes that you will see it.

At the bottom of the SERP fold is the first organic search result.

The Real Picture is a targeted ad based on my music history, related video roles I clicked on, and the Sia fansite that I follow closely on Facebook (their Elastic Heart music video was on the next level and I was a Trailer).

Enhance your strategy with retargeting tools

While the Sia ad campaign was appearing on Facebook, I also found Sia-related content on YouTube and Spotify. With retargeting tools, your campaign can be displayed to searchers in different places depending on the interaction.

This interaction can consist of filling out a contact form without buying or placing items in an online shopping cart and closing the page.

Retargeting is a great strategy for reaching people who would otherwise forget about your website. After seeing a redirected ad between five and six times, a prospect is more likely to convert double that.

However, to switch, they must first click on the ad.

This is where PPC comes in.

How is CPC calculated and how does it affect PPC performance?

While the above example was neat and tidy, the CPC depends on a few factors:

  • How competitive are the keywords you are using?
  • Click rate.
  • Search volume for the keyword.
  • Ad Rank.

Regardless of the industry or company, these standards are maintained on all digital advertising platforms. Each platform sets its own quality standards to determine where your ad will appear.

No two platforms cost the same

Most platforms use a bid process to determine the CPC of a particular keyword. The bidding process is similar to a market bid, in which the more desirable a keyword, the higher the costs.

The following is a breakdown of the average cost of some ad networks to give you an example (note: your mileage may vary):

Google: $ 0.49

  • This is determined by your actual cost per click, which can differ from the maximum amount you are willing to pay for a click.

Facebook: $ 1

  • The tendering process is based on supply and demand. A PPC ad on Facebook is determined by the bid, the value customers get when they click your ad, and the number of actions someone can take after they click the ad (follow, buy, etc.).

Youtube: $ 0.20

  • This is a typical bid configuration based on ad type and destination options, with the exception of ad format. YouTube ad formats include ad, consultation, and skippable video ads.

Source: WebFX

Deciding between paid search ads or paid social ads depends on who you’ve heard or where they are in their buying process.

Reach out to copper people to understand where your audience spends most of their time and where you can reach them during the buying process.

Example: appearing in a Google search is ideal for a research phase. In the meantime, a social ad is better for those who are new to your brand.

Create a strategic approach for your next PPC campaign

Imagine you’re a small plant shop in Denver that just got a new batch of beautiful succulents.

While residents in the area may know your business exists in this location, you should make extra efforts to expand your online presence to non-local digital customers.

Here are the steps you need to take to reach your trendy, loving audience.

1. Choose your keywords

The goal is to select a number of succulent keywords that will be most profitable for your business.

Examples:

  • “Buy succulents”
  • “Online Juicy Seller”
  • “Buy plants online”

These terms clearly indicate the seeker’s intent: They have their wallets out and are ready to buy.

Tools like SEMrush or Google Keyword Planner are ideal for gathering ideas and understanding how high the competition can be and the cost of using the keywords.

2. Design your ad

This is the part where your brand can creatively communicate with your audience for the first time.

Creating a motivational ad with a call to action (CTA) can be tricky. Here are some tips:

  • Make it short. Pick 3-10 words that tell the reader exactly what to do (“Pass Today!”, “Click to Get 50% Off”, etc.).
  • Use action verbs at the beginning of your CTA (get, get started, download, sign up, sign up, give, buy, etc.). This makes your CTA very clear while drawing your attention.
  • Add your logo or company name.
  • Design your ad to be visually appealing and yet noticeable.
  • Make sure the Colors and typography are consistent with your brand.
  • Make the CTA clickable with a link that navigates to your landing page.

3. Optimize your landing page

Include your target keywords in relevant, natural places on your landing page, e.g. B. in the title, in the meta description and in the text copy. Use a tool like MarketMuse to know exactly where your page is ahead of the competition and how to customize its content to improve performance.

4. Set your bid requirements

It can be a little tricky when you are in a new process. We’ll use Google Ads as an example of our hypothetical suitability:

  1. Check out the Google Keyword Planner: Enter your target word (buy succulents) and compare prices for suggested bids.
  2. Separate your keywords from broad (succulents) to specific (buy succulents, buy succulents online, buy plants online, Denver Plant Store, etc.) in google ad groups.
  3. Use geotargeting where useful.
  4. Offer The exact recommended bid cost for certain keywords and slightly less for broader keywords – the broader search may not be exactly relevant to what a person is actually looking for (e.g., “What are the most popular succulents?”).
  5. Add a relevant landing page for each keyword or phrase.
  6. Set your maximum CPC based on your profit margin and your CPA.

Each advertising platform will be a little different, but you want to get a good idea of ​​how your ads are performing and how much your campaign will cost.

5. Analyze your results

Every advertising network is different and your results will vary. What works for Facebook may need to be tweaked for YouTube. Constantly monitor your campaigns and measure your results against your predicted performance. Make adjustments if necessary.

With all of the above guides, your succulents are sure to find a wonderful home in Denver.