Utilizing filters in Google Analytics

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Accurate data is essential for decision making. Google Analytics can provide this data, but it may need some cleaning up. Filters in Google Analytics can remove data contamination, e.g.

  • Development or other internal (employee) traffic,
  • Inconsistent capitalization of URLs, titles, events, campaigns and the like
  • Multiple websites or hostnames are displayed in an Analytics property.

In this post I will introduce Google Analytics filters.

Create filters

Access the tab “Admin” from google analytics on the plane “account” or “view” on filter too. (A “view” is a subset of an account “property”which may have its own configuration settings for specific users or reports.)

Access the tab “Admin” on the layer “account” or “view” on filter too. Click on the image to enlarge it.

Admin> Account> All Filters lists all filters for all views. You can add, remove or create new filters in all views.

Under Admin> View> Filters you can create a filter or add an existing filter. I’ll be using the view settings for the examples in this post.

Google Analytics does not contain any standard filters. Therefore, filters will not appear unless you add them.

Google Analytics does not have any standard filters. Filters won’t appear if you don’t add them, such as: B. these examples. Click on the image to enlarge it.

IP exclusion filter Exclude certain IP addresses or ranges, usually to block employee traffic reporting. Use descriptive names for this filter (e.g. “Exclude office traffic” or “Exclude my private IP address”) instead of repeating the IP address as a name.

Use descriptive names for the IP filter, e.g.  B.

Use descriptive names for the IP filter, e.g. B. “Exclude office traffic” or “Exclude my private IP address”instead of repeating the IP address.

Include filters Only allow traffic from specific hostnames, geographic locations, campaigns, and other traffic in reports.

“Lock in” Filters only allow reporting on specific hostnames, geographic locations, campaigns, and other traffic.

Upper and lower case filter Clean up your inconsistent case in Events, Pages, Campaigns, and more. The lowercase filter is more common than uppercase.

Upper and lower case letters clean up the inconsistent case in events, pages, campaigns and more.

Upper and lower case letters clean up the inconsistent case in events, pages, campaigns and more.

Find and replace filters and advanced filters Change field values. In a typical example, the host name is appended to the request URI (ie the web page). This can be useful when a company has multiple websites and subdomains that visitors access in a single session.

A general advanced filter appends the host name (

A general advanced filter depends on the host name (“hub.powermyanalytics.com”) to a website.

The settings for an advanced filter are:

  • Filter type. Advanced
  • Field A. Extract A: Hostname = (. *) The (. *) Characters include everything.
  • Field B. Extract B: Request URI = (. *)
  • Output to. Constructor: Request URI = $ A1 $ B1. This means that the two fields are combined.

Make sure to check the boxes “Field A required” and “Overwrite output field” are checked and leave the other check boxes unchecked. This means that the host name must be present and that the Request URI field is overwritten with the combined host name and request URI.

Make sure to check the boxes

Make sure to check the boxes “Field A required” and “Overwrite output field” are checked and leave the other check boxes unchecked.

Check the filters

Review your filters as soon as possible to make sure they are working as intended to minimize the impact on reporting if something goes wrong. There are several ways to do this.

In the filter itself. Some filters can be used to see how the data is changing how the reporting is done.

Some filters provide a preview of how the data will change the reporting process.

Some filters provide a preview of how the data will change the reporting process.

Test the same settings in your reports. If you only provide a specific host name, you can apply the same filter to your host name report under Audience> Technology> Network and then click the Host Name tab between the graph and table on the page.

If you only provide a specific host name, apply the same filter to your host name report under Audience> Technology> Network, then click the Host Name tab between the chart and table on the page.” Width =”700″ Height =”280″ srcset =”https://www.practicalecommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Google-Analytics-9.jpg 1000w, https://www.practicalecommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Google -Analytics-9-300×120.jpg 300w, https://www.practicalecommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Google-Analytics-9-570×228.jpg 570w, https://www.practicalecommerce.com /wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Google-Analytics-9-768×307.jpg 768w, https://www.practicalecommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Google-Analytics-9-150×60.  jpg 150w, https://www.practicalecommerce.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Google-Analytics-9-500×200.jpg 500w” Sizes =”(maximum width: 700 pixels) 100 VW, 700 pixels”/></p>
<p id=If you only provide a specific host name, apply the same filter to your host name report under Audience> Technology> Network, then click the Host Name tab between the chart and table on the page. Click on the image to enlarge it.

When verifying, align the filter settings with the view-level setup.

Align the filter settings when reviewing the view-level setup.

Align the filter settings when reviewing the view-level setup. Click on the image to enlarge it.

If, for example, in the filter settings at view level “equal” use the same setting when reviewing your reports.

If you are at the view level

If you are at the view level “equal” use the same setting when reviewing your reports.

Real-time reports. Confirm that the filters are working properly with real-time reports. Certain filters, e.g. B. “Lower case letters for events”, are easier to confirm than others. If you see wrong events in real time, check your filter again.

The real-time report in this example shows that the filters are not working.

The real-time report in this example shows that the filters are not working.

Subsequent reportslike later that day or the next day.

Filter order

The order in which filters are listed for a view affects the data. In general, place filters in this order:

  1. Include / exclude filters.
  2. Find and replace filters or advanced filters.
  3. Lower / upper case filter.

The above sequence simplifies the process and allows the filters to apply to as much raw data as possible. For example, there is no reason to write a hostname in lowercase that you filter out anyway.

You can change the filter order by clicking the Assign Filter Order button.

Change the filter order by clicking the button

Change the filter order by clicking the button “Assign filter order” click.

For more resources, see “Information about view filters” in the “Analytics help” from Google.